Indoor Air Pollutants and Allergy Sources

    • Carpets, cushions and stuffed toys containing dust mites, bacteria, carpet beetles or mold. These biological organisms and their by-products become aerosolized when these items are walked on, sat on or played with.
    • Off-gassing of irritating volatile organic compounds from carpets, furniture, vinyl-fiberglass screens, leveling compounds, floor tile adhesives, household chemical products and heated plastics in computers, video monitors and photocopiers.
    • Mold contaminated heating or cooling systems and supply ducts.
    • Humidifiers, dehumidifiers, refrigerator drip pans and coils containing mold or bacteria.
    • All pets due to dander/skin cells, feathers, dried saliva on fur (especially cats) and in the case of dogs and cats, all of the pollutants brought indoors on paws or fur after being outdoors.
    • Scented products: shampoos, candles, sprays, cleaners, detergents, fabric softeners, air fresheners, etc.
    • Fish tank filtration and aeration systems bubbling algae and other bioaerosols into the air.
    • Cedar walls and mothballs emit chemicals that can irritate people sensitized to them.
    • Insect body parts, fecal material and rodent or animal urine/feces in attics, crawl spaces or living areas.
    • Combustion gases and particulate matter from environmental tobacco smoke, unvented kerosene and gas space heaters, woodstoves, fireplaces, gas stoves, faulty chimneys or flues and cracked furnace heat exchangers.
    • Soot particles from burning candles in jars. Firewood stored indoors (insects/mold).
    • Carbonless paper can cause allergic reactions in some people who handle the forms, which causes chemical particulates to become aerosolized.